Documentary: Ladies in the Hills and Valleys - Illustrator Ilana Greener
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Documentary: Ladies in the Hills and Valleys - Illustrator Ilana Greener

ABOUT THE DOCUMENTARY There are five participating women in the documentary. They each bring a unique personality, craft and wisdom about how to navigate life, creativity and self-care. The artists all live and work in the Yarra Ranges, which embraces the Yarra Valley region and Dandenong Ranges. It is a sub rural region on the fringe of Melbourne, Australia which is known for its natural beauty, slower lifestyle and strong sense of local community. WHY CREATE A DOCUMENTARY? The documentary began as a local response to COVID-19 and lockdowns. It was designed to empower women by giving them the opportunity to tell their stories, promote their art practices, and build local and online audiences. It also showcases the local area, and promotes positive wellbeing through connection, community, creativity, recreation and being amongst nature. The project has been funded by the Yarra Ranges Council community grants and supported by Auspicious Arts. ABOUT ILANA GREENER Children's illustrator and artist Ilana Greener wins the hearts of 'little people' and 'big people' through her evocative design portfolio. Ilana's sketches, drawings and paintings come to life in her Dandenong Ranges studio, which is surrounded by forests, lakes and mountains. The talented artist is also Mum to three young boys - and many of their shared hills adventures are translated into captivating art forms. Ilana's story unveils not just a talented illustrator, but someone who articulates poetic insights and wisdom on the importance of creativity and nature to thrive. She creates beautiful prints, cards, merchandise and toys to delight both the young and young at heart. Director, Producer and Original Music - Pearley Jones Videographer - Vanessa White Photographs - Belinda Denney, Alana Langan, Annette O’Brien & Amelia Stanwix Music List - Blind, City of Love & Brand New Day Musicians - Jason Vorherr, Yolande van Oosten & Steve Vertigan Recording Studio - Soggy Dog Studio Special Thanks - Alana Langan, Ivy Muse Team, Yarra Ranges Council & Auspicious Arts WEB LINKS Pearley Jones - Director/Producer www.pearleyjones.com Vanessa White - Videographer www.vanessawhiteart.com Ilana Greener - Interviewee - Illustrator/artist www.littledreaming.com
Flesh After Fifty - 500 Strong - Participant Interviews
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Flesh After Fifty - 500 Strong - Participant Interviews

This video was created to be shown along side Ponch Hawkes exhibition '500 Strong'. Video Credits: Jane Scott: Interviewer Vanessa White: Videographer Special thanks to our volunteers and interviewees: Ponch Hawkes, Susan Broadway, Lea Thorpe, Lila Moosad, Jenny Heland-Chaplin, Deborah Vanderwerp, Ann Marie Harris, Margot Sharman, Heather Guilfoyle, Jane Leonard, Sue Jackson, Kate Rodman- Brown, Robyn Karas, Peta Murray, Adrienne White, Lynne Heggie, Vivienne Halat, Merren Ricketson, Wendy Lorraine Davis, Jean Taylor, Ute Linton, Liza Dezfouli, Fortunata Callipari, Caroline Clark, Chris McCormick, Leisa Prowd, Lyn Talbot, Alison Cleary, Julie Ball, Belinda Davies, Kelly Fry, Anna Taylor, Bea Jones, Rachel Boyce. About '500 Strong': Why these women over 50 happily got naked in front of a stranger - By Kerrie O'Brien 'Melbourne photographer Ponch Hawkes has shot a stunning black and white series of older women in the raw, resulting in a joyous representation of bodies in all shapes and sizes. Called 500 Strong, the exhibition celebrates womanhood generally and those featured specifically, breaking the bizarre taboo that suggests bodies of this ilk should not be seen.'... Link to the article: https://www.smh.com.au/culture/art-and-design/why-these-women-over-50-happily-got-naked-in-front-of-a-stranger-20210216-p57316.html Exhibition: Flesh After Fifty Venue: Abbotsford Convent Curator: Jane Scott Website: www.fleshafterfifty.com/program.html About 'Flesh After Fifty': We live in a society swamped with images, where high value is placed on physical appearance and an association between attractiveness and youth, particularly for women. Flesh after Fifty will explore and challenge negative stereotypes of aging while celebrating and promoting positive images of older women through art. Australian artists have a history of photographing, painting and sculpting the female form, mostly by and for men whose interest in exploring youth, vulnerability and beauty has dominated the images we recognise. The way in which artists portray older women often reflects public attitudes. Images of older women have changed over the last century as fashion, community, politics and society have changed. Much of the time, images of older women are absent altogether. Some artists, however, are able to rise above fashion and convention to externalise personal desires and aspirations that challenge received perceptions and expectations. Flesh after Fifty will bring to the fore images that need revisiting or have been overlooked, plus 10 new commissioned art installations that explore social issues, health and empowerment of older women. Artists have been challenged to produce art that explores untold stories that reveal the way in which fashion, ageism and oppression of women has influenced what we see and how we interpret older women in society. This exhibition will be accompanied by curatorial discourse and community engagement in a series of forums, events and essays by key academics, artists and community leaders exploring the politics and social impact around the construction of images of older women, addressing this topic in the pursuit of a new visual dynamic and appreciation of the older female form.
'No More Humbug' - animation - Kimberley Kriol version
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'No More Humbug' - animation - Kimberley Kriol version

'No More Humbug' is part of a tool kit that was created by Kimberley Community Legal Services (KCLS), in partnership with local Aboriginal research consultancy Kimberley Jiyigas, the first-ever detailed study of financial elder abuse specifically in remote towns and Aboriginal communities. Overview and Links to material: This groundbreaking research and toolkit was developed by Kimberley Jiyigas, commissioned by KCLS with financial support of the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department. Based on extensive interviews across the Kimberley, this work highlights the causes and prevalence of elder financial abuse, and what can be done to change things for our families and communities. Click here for our media release launching the research here. The full report can be accessed here. https://static1.squarespace.com/static/56aae0e04d088e4dfa68396f/t/5fd2cb14a3ffdf15f0988a97/1607650229752/No+More+Humbug+final+report.pdf Kimberley Jiyigas (Birds) was engaged by Kimberley Community Legal Services (KCLS) to research financial abuse of Aboriginal elders. No More Humbug is the result of that work, summarising six months of intensive community and stakeholder interviews and survey work. It is the first detailed examination of this issue published in Australia. The objectives of this research were to: Although this work is specific to the Kimberley, we also hope it will be transferrable and helpful to other Aboriginal communities in remote regions. This report goes together with a set of resources, including posters, animations and a practical training manual, to draw attention to the issue and to explore solutions. “An older person I know got $20K, and her family insisted she take the whole amount out. They gave her a few hundred and then the large crowd that surrounded her took the rest and left. There is greed happening. If people don’t get what they want, they will intimidate and threaten and even bash the older person.” Aboriginal Voice (Grandmother) "Humbugging" is an Aboriginal term used in the Kimberley to describe when someone demands money that belongs to someone else with no intention of repaying it. ‘Resource-sharing’ is a cultural practice commonly seen among Aboriginal people. However, “humbugging” usually has a negative connotation. It is used to describe demands that are repeated, often with a threat or actual physical, emotional or psychological abuse if the person refuses. Sometimes the term is used to describe outright theft, for example when somebody uses another person’s bank card or Centrepay arrangements without their permission. “We used to go out with other mob telling stories and having day trips. We were teachers. The language centre took us out bush. And we lived rough. Young people today live a very fancy life. The house is different. Old people worked hard and focused on the important things in life like family care. Today young people are more worried about when their grandmother gets paid.” Aboriginal Voice (Grandmother) “To reduce ‘humbugging’, we assisted one client by working with Centrelink to have his payments given to him each day in the amount of $50. He no longer receives lump sum fortnightly payments. He comes into the bank every day and we give him the $50 in cash. He does not need ID. All our staff know him, and this has been in place for 2 years now.” Stakeholder comment (Financial Institution Worker) Videos and posters addressing the problem of elder abuse in our communities can be accessed here (feel free to download and distribute these - they are meant to be used by everybody!): https://static1.squarespace.com/static/56aae0e04d088e4dfa68396f/t/5fd2ce25dcb5ba508d9d9e09/1607650874426/Jiyigas+Elder+Abuse+Poster+Option+1+PDF.PDF For more information contact Chuck Berger, KCLS Manager, at manager@kcls.org.au or 0417 447599. The research was led by Natasha Short, Managing Director, Kimberley Jiyigas - contact admin@kimberleybirds.com.au A zoom video of Natasha discussing the findings of the research can be viewed here. https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/play/HVWUdwGYS-yMdeMY-fz5iQKG1uaUFUvq84q5xBYrc8W-oq6XVWbZpTiqp-ldEkVRrk0xtrPzhTVse8Al.TrwKrZrFFQLmQ85T?startTime=1607583526000&_x_zm_rtaid=L2i7fBypT32iNvtX6MJ7pA.1607729271753.5f3abb1c3a2a2a1cdbe5c1919c185fbe&_x_zm_rhtaid=198 Artwork and animation: Vanessa White www.vanessawhiteart.com
'Everything I Know', Anna Paddick  - Music Video
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'Everything I Know', Anna Paddick - Music Video

Anna Paddick: Singer, Song Writer, Artist Ben Paddick: Guitarist, Musical Collaborator Christian Meyer: Guitarist, Keys/Synth, Musical Collaborator Alan Dinh: Bassist, Synth, Musical Collaborator Markus Meyer: Studio Engineer (Recording) Julian Meyer: Studio Engineer (Mixing and Mastering) Vanessa White: Videographer, Collaborator Kevin Jeynes: Performance Artist, Co-inquirer Rod Price: Foley Sound www.annapaddick.com https://soundcloud.com/annapaddick www.annapaddick.bandcamp.com 'Everything I Know' music video released 4/09/20 A word from Anna about 'Everything I Know'. 'The process of giving form to this song and video clip has allowed me to stay with a multifaceted and evolving question, ‘What do we think we know now of isolation, of interconnectedness, and possible ways of being with the truths of ourselves?’ I’ve explored this question through the lense of my own experiencing and offer it now to you as a springboard for further experiencing and meaning-making. This song emerged through a multimodal exploration, through feeling, painting, sculpting, dreaming, enacting, drawing, talking, listening, moving, playing, writing, singing, and making sounds in relation to (and as an enactment of) some of my relational patterns, especially in the context of holding experiences of trauma, and experimenting with degrees of openness and collaborative holding. I don’t quite know how to adequately acknowledge the people who have held this process with me, some of whom I name below: Ben Paddick: Guitarist, Musical Collaborator Christian Meyer: Guitarist, Keys/Synth, Musical Collaborator Alan Dinh: Bassist, Synth, Musical Collaborator Markus Meyer: Studio Engineer (Recording) Julian Meyer: Studio Engineer (Mixing and Mastering) Vanessa White: Videographer, Editor, Collaborator Kevin Jeynes: Performance Artist, Co-inquirer Rod Price: Foley Sound While this offering represents ‘Everything I Know’, I would invite an edgelessness into the meaning of that statement, whereby we might include everything we know, everything we don’t know, everything we are un-knowing, and everything we are coming to know, in process, always. I hope that this song and video may serve you as an invitation to gently notice yourself in relationship with it, and as a gesture of being alongside you in relating to the question, ‘What do we think we know now of isolation, of interconnectedness, and possible ways of being with the truths of ourselves?’ My intention in sharing art is to be part of a kind, honest, and curious conversation that can serve us all. In the spirit of that I would welcome any creative responses that may arise. Tag me in a post or whatevs. In these challenging times, while Covid 19 has erased so many possibilities for interaction and participation, may we be artful and courageous in creating new ways of collaborating and feeling the presence of one another. With love and gratitude, Anna Paddick'